I just reached to a high school using International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) standards. Last week, I spoke to a few representatives at ISTE and gave them a flawless demo how their standards are assigned and shown on learning labels; still negotiating with ISTE on a commercial license to use their standards.

This is the third set of national education standards integrated into the learning labels interface. The others are Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and Common Core (CC). The labels technology is designed to work with all standards. There is also functionality to create your own dynamic standards.

There is no better way to work with education and training standards. Once the standards are in the system, learning practitioners assign standards to skills for a task or experience; the interface supports starting with skills to get standards and vice versa. There is also a search to help find the standards.

A learning label is a clear, concise display – easily understood by everyone (particularly students). On the display, the standards appear with full attribution to the source of the standards with a link to a full explanation. More than one set of standards might be referenced on a label.

Standards have always been a part of the learning labels technology (referenced in the patent application in 2016). I get asked: “With a learning label, how do I know the reported expectations are accurate?”. Standards provide a basis to validate the learning by anchoring the expectations. Of course, there is an important next step to verify the accuracy through an accreditation or peer review.

I talked about standards and learning labels in these previous posts: Teach to Skill and Learning Label and Standards.

If you are required to implement or are exploring using education or training standards in a curriculum, onboarding, or training program, then contact our team for a free consultation.